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Interview: the mystery behind Boy Epic

The mystery known as Boy Epic is back – with a new music video that’ll make you want to hit the replay button before it’s even over.

There is little known about the artist (nor his real name or real age) but you still feel like you know him. His music resonates as it is up to the brim with dark, somber lyrics, yet with a powerful beat that still makes you want to do something. “My musical influences stem from a more visual aspect, rather than other sounds, or other musical artists. I write about what I see, and experience in life,” he tells Popdust in an exclusive interview. “I’ve also experienced some dark times in my life. All of those things infused together creates my sound.”

Popdust sat down with Boy Epic to discuss all things Kanye, the process behind an Epic music video and what comes next.

Is there a story behind the name “Boy Epic”?

The name “Boy Epic” was a result of a drunken night and seeing a news article titled “Boy’s EPIC Ballon Adventure.” It was about a young boy who ventured off alone in a hot-air balloon. I found it hilarious. So naturally, it stuck with me.

What was it like shooting “Kanye’s In My Head”?

Shooting the video was fun and a wonderful learning experience. With every video treatment I write, direct, and edit, there are moments within that are filled with growth to my artistry. It’s my favorite part.

We thought the American flag with “Kanye” spray-painted on it was an interesting touch. Where’s the connection there?

During the treatment/filming process, the election was taking place in my country. The Trump phenomenon if you will. It had such an impact on society, that I found myself distracted by it. So the spray painted American flag is my ode to that particular time frame in history. Also because “I’m hearing” (in Trumps voice) Kanye is going to run for president in 2020.

You are known for your seamless merging of music and film. How do you approach the making of a music video?

The process is simple, obviously the videos tone/emotion is based on the song itself. When I’m writing a song in the studio, I’m also planning the video in my head. To me, the video is equally as important as the song. With that being said, I then turn to my giant library of movies in my home and pick about 5 films that could relate to that same emotion the song and video idea will portray. I then watch these movies a few times, pick my favorites scenes, look at the coloring, etc. and I start writing the treatment and developing my “character.” Once this is done, I prepare to film, find my locations, wardrobe, and my co-star(s). Once filming is complete, I then begin what I like to call, the death process. The editing/post-production. I edit everything myself, staying awake for hours, forgetting to sleep, drink, and eat because I fall so deep in editing that I forget the world around me. Editing is a form of art, and it consumes me, but I love it.

You have an interesting sound – it’s very aware of itself as pop but there’s a darker side to it. What are some of your musical influences?

My musical influences stem from a more visual aspect, rather than other sounds, or other musical artists. I write about what I see, and experience in life. I love pop music, and I love dark films. I’ve also experienced some dark times in my life. All of those things infused together creates my sound.

Would you say your upbringing in Dallas influenced your sound at all?

The city of Dallas itself hasn’t really influenced me, but my experiences in life in general are my true influences. They just so happened to take place in Dallas.

You said in an interview with Outword Magazine that you think “people are too involved in an artist’s life.” Does social media make things better or worse for someone wanting to break into the industry?

Social media today, is everything. You just can’t use it for the wrong reasons. Because of social media I’m able to connect with the wonderful people who listen/watch and support me all over the world. You are in complete control over your social presence to a certain point, meaning, perception is reality. There’s nothing wrong with a little mystery. Just remember, everyone’s a critic.

What was the writing process like for your upcoming EP “Everyone’s Strange”?

The emotional connection working with Jason Evigan and my production partner Cut Down Trees has been one of the best learning experience of my musical career so far. I’ve really grown so much from it. Tapping into all my emotions and feeding them into different melodies has been rewarding.

Can we expect a full-length release anytime soon?

Absolutely. But not in the way you would expect. I’m trying to be different in all areas, even down to the business side of my industry. It’s better to go against the current instead of just existing in a over-crowded, copy of a copy world, that is the music industry.

What’s next for Boy Epic?

You’ll see soon enough.

You can find Boy Epic on his official Facebook, as well as Twitter and Instagram.

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